Mar 18 , 2014
 
 
 
We are proud to be a part of powering your future.
 
 
On March 13, 1889, Avista, formerly known as Washington Water Power, was incorporated eight months before the Washington Territory became a state. Today, the company is one of only three companies remaining in the state that are classified as Territorial Corporations – incorporated before Washington’s statehood. (See a Video of the presentation.)
The company began on the banks of the Spokane River with the Monroe Street plant, using hydropower to generate electricity for the growing city of Spokane Falls. Today, clean, renewable resources remain a significant part of the company’s diversified mix for energy generation.

Bridge

 
Over the generations of providing energy services, one thing has remained constant for our company: We are honored to provide the energy and resources that have helped families and commerce be successful, whether it is in the home, enjoying the outdoors or building successful businesses. We’re proud to call each community we serve “home,” and we’re proud to be your partner in bringing energy for life.
 
We invite you to visit our Avista Legacy website to get a wonderful overview of our company through our new video and to experience the rich history of our company through our Centennial Book, published in 1989 and our new 125th Anniversary Commemorative Book.

History by Region
Our service territory spans more than 30,000 miles throughout Washington, Northern Idaho, and Oregon. The communities we serve have a rich history that we’re proud to be part of. We’ve captured some of these highlights in our 125th Anniversary Tabloid. You can view it online or download and print. We hope you enjoy this trip down memory lane by region.
 
Huntington Park in Downtown Spokane to open in May
On May 2, 2014, Avista will celebrate the renovation of Huntington Park, property the company owns along the banks of the Spokane River, just west of Spokane’s City Hall. The renovation and enhancements include work on the walkways, grassy areas and structures to provide residents and visitors greater access to the river and views of the falls.
Huntington Park
 
A new plaza at City Hall will be dedicated that day as a gift to Spokane in celebration of the company’s 125 anniversary. The new plaza will create open-air space for gatherings and river viewing, and includes two water features and a fire feature.
 
For the first time in more than 100 years, the view of the spectacular lower falls of the Spokane River will be opened up for easy viewing from the park, the plaza or the streets of Spokane.
Learn more about Huntington Park.
 
Salmon Chief to oversee Huntington Park
Artist Virgil “Smoker” Marchand created an inspirational Native American sculpture – Salmon Chief - to oversee Huntington Park, which will be dedicated in May.
 
Marchand says the sculpture represents a Native American tradition of a man who was appointed to ensure all area tribes received enough Salmon to make it through the winter.
The Native American sitting atop his horse is raising the salmon like a blessing to the river. The horse and man statute is over 12-feet tall and took more than three weeks to make. Several other pieces will be added to the display in the spring.
Salmon Chief
 
 
 
 
Published: 3/18/2014  11:52 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Mar 11 , 2014
Post Falls Dam
 
 
On Thursday, March 13th Avista Utilities is hosting a public information meeting to update the community on details for the restoration and upgrade of the over 100-year-old South Channel Dam at the Post Falls Hydroelectric Development (HED). The meeting will take place from 6:30-8:00 p.m. in City Council Chambers at the Post Falls City Administration Building, 408 N. Spokane Street.
 
The public is invited to attend the event, which will outline the project details and construction plans. The presentation will be followed by an open Q&A session where you can talk with project experts. Q’emiln Park, including the boat launch, swim area, trailhead and pavilion, and the Spokane River between the Spokane Street Bridge and the boaters safety cables are expected to be open as normal this summer with limited exceptions.
 
The construction methods that will be used in the project were chosen to minimize disruption in the area, while protecting the safety of the public, environment and wildlife. The project, designed to restore the dam located on the south channel of the Spokane River near Q’emiln Park, is expected to begin this spring with construction completed by December 2014 and final road work and landscaping to be completed in spring 2015.
 
It’s easy to stay up-to-date on project information and impacts. Just send us an email at SpokaneRiverNews@avistacorp.com and you will be added to the distribution list for our email alerts. Be sure to type "Post Falls Updates" in the subject line and include your name and email address in the body text. You can also get timely project information, including the project fact sheet on our website. Just type “Post Falls Dam” in the Ask a Question field.
 

 
Published: 3/11/2014  12:20 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Nov 14 , 2013
 
 
 
When you think about historic structures in our region that have undergone important restoration, buildings like The Davenport Hotel, Fox Theater or the Steam Plant might come to mind.
Next year, one of Avista’s historic facilities will be given a much-needed facelift as well.
 
Built in 1906, the South Channel Dam at the Post Falls Hydroelectric Development (HED) is more than 100 years old. While it’s stood the test of time, we plan to continue the safe and reliable operation of the facility with an extensive restoration and upgrade beginning in spring 2014. Work is scheduled to be completed by December 2014.
 
The structure’s original facing concrete and gate frames, as well as the gates and manual rack and pinion hoists will be removed and replaced with new facing concrete, automated spillway gates and hoists.  The improvements will preserve the life of the 106-year-old structure and automation will improve operation efficiencies.
 
During construction the project will affect some areas of Q’emiln Park. To maintain public safety, access to areas including the boat launch, trailhead and pavilion will be impacted. The west entrance road and adjacent portion of the park will be an active construction site with material, equipment and vehicles in the area. More information on the impact will be known after a contractor is selected in January 2014.
 
It’s easy to stay up-to-date on project information and impacts. Just send us an email at SpokaneRiverNews@avistacorp.com and you will be added to the distribution list for our e-newsletter. Be sure to type "Post Falls Updates" in the subject line and include your name and email address in the body text. You can also get timely project information, including the project fact sheet on our Website.
 
The Post Falls HED has been a key to helping Avista produce clean, renewable, low-cost power and it creates recreational opportunities like boating and swimming near Q’emiln Park.
 
Made up of three dams in the area, the Post Falls HED produces 15 megawatts of clean energy – that’s enough to power 11,250 homes – and helps control water levels of Lake Coeur d’Alene during the summer recreation season.

 
Published: 11/14/2013  2:24 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

May 30 , 2013
 
 
Over the past few years, we’ve heard from our customers that they want more information about how we do business in areas like utility operations, environmental stewardship and our community partnerships. Avista’s fifth annual report on our performance – our sustainability responsibility report -- is titled “Shared Value – Shared Success.”
 
Our purpose statement says, “To improve life’s quality with energy – safely, reliably and responsibly.”  Each year, our report provides a comprehensive look at what goes into providing that energy and how often this has additional benefits to the customers and communities we serve. That’s shared value.
 
In this year’s report, we tell many stories of how shared value is created throughout our business. We’ve added some great graphics to help illustrate some of the information, as well as links to videos and other online resources to give readers many different ways to get the most complete story possible.
 
As part of our sustainable business practices, the report is published only online. But a PDF file can be downloaded for your convenience in reading the report or sharing it with others.
 
Shared value is at the heart of what Avista does every day. We hope you’ll take the time to read this year’s report and give us your feedback by email at SharedValue@avistacorp.com. We want to hear from you about how we can continue to build shared value and shared successes.

 
Published: 5/30/2013  9:46 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Jan 23 , 2013
 
Picture of Lake Spokane with water receded from shore
 
 
Avista Utilities will start to draw down the water level at Lake Spokane (Long Lake Reservoir) today. Operators expect to lower the reservoir up to one foot per day for a two to three-week period, until it reaches its winter elevation of 13 to 14 feet below maximum summer elevation of 1,536 feet.
 
Under the right weather conditions, which include sustained periods of single-digit temperatures and little or no snow on the exposed lakebed, the drawdown is expected to help control Eurasian watermilfoil and other invasive aquatic weeds found in Lake Spokane. The drawdown also allows shoreline homeowners the opportunity to complete state and locally permitted repair and construction projects along the lake shoreline.
 
Property owners and lake-users are reminded to make necessary preparations, including removing boats from the water, and removing or securing docks and boathouses to accommodate shifting ice and low-water conditions. Floating and removable docks are less susceptible to damage from shifting or changing ice levels.
 
The lower winter elevation will be maintained as long as river flows allow. However, during the drawdown period water levels are subject to change due to a variety of factors, such as weather (rain on snow events in the upper drainages) or maintenance at the Long Lake Dam. Lake users should always be alert to signs of such changes and exercise the highest level of personal caution and safety.
 
Avista also has a 24-hour telephone information line that provides notification of anticipated changes on Lake Spokane, the Spokane River and Coeur d’Alene Lake. In Washington, call (509) 495-8043; in Idaho, call (208) 769-1357.
 
The recorded information is provided to advise shoreline property owners, commercial and recreational users of changes in the lake and river elevation levels that may affect plans for water use. You can also check current river and lake levels on our website.
 

 
Published: 1/23/2013  12:46 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Nov 28 , 2012
Cabinet Gorge banner

This hydroelectric dam on the Clark Fork River is still a youngster at 60 years old
 
Whenever you flip a light switch, plug in an appliance, or turn on your furnace, you expect and receive energy on demand. Since the completion of our very first hydroelectric project in 1890, Avista’s dams have generated dependable, cost-effective and environmentally responsible power for our customers.

We’ve been celebrating the 60th anniversary of one of our youngest dams, Cabinet Gorge, throughout the year. Recently we had a banner produced that will hang in the control center at the dam. In November, Avista received special recognition from Idaho Lt. Governor Brad Little. The Lieutenant Governor presented a proclamation honoring the contribution of Cabinet Gorge to the region and the state of Idaho.

This year also marks the 14th year of successful, collaborative implementation of the Clark Fork Settlement Agreement, a multi-stakeholder agreement for managing and protecting the natural resources associated with our Clark Fork Hydroelectric Project. The agreement, signed in 1999 after several years of negotiation, resulted in a 45-year operating license from FERC to operate Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids.

With growing development of renewable energy like wind and solar, which depend on variable fuel sources, our dams are even more important as a dependable source of energy. Water can be stored and hydropower plants can be fired up quickly to meet energy need when the wind isn’t blowing.
Published: 11/28/2012  11:09 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Nov 02 , 2012
Q’emiln Park boat launch to close Nov. 5
 

Removal of a wooden intake gate at Post Falls Dam
A timber intake gate is removed from the Post Falls Dam in
August 2012. We’re replacing the lifting hoists and old timber
intake gates at the dam with modern lifting hoists and new
steel gates.
You may remember early this summer we announced a project to replace the lifting hoists and old timber intake gates at our Post Falls Dam on the Spokane River with modern lifting hoists and new steel gates. The project began in July and crews will continue to work on it into the winter until it’s completed. The dam needs ongoing maintenance and updates to keep it running safely and efficiently. The work is expected to update a system that is more than 100 years old in places, enhancing safety and increasing reliability and efficiency at the dam.

Currently we’re completing work on the first of the dam’s six intake gates.  This week we temporarily opened spill gates at the dam to test the operation of the first new gate and put the generating unit below it back into service. 

Seasonal closure of Q’emiln Park boat launch Nov. 5
The Q’emiln Park boat launch will be closed for the season beginning Monday, Nov. 5. The ramp is typically closed each year in mid-November due to weather conditions and dropping water levels.

The boat launch must remain closed for safety reasons whenever water is spilled through gates at the Post Falls Dam, which can be the case for much of the fall through spring. Generally, the ramp re-opens in the late spring or early summer, depending on the amount of inflows into Coeur d’Alene Lake.

As a result of Avista’s annual drawdown of Coeur d’Alene Lake, Spokane River levels above the dam will be approximately two and a half feet below the summer full-pool elevation of 2,128 feet on Nov. 5. Water levels may drop by as much as five additional feet by the end of January. These water levels are subject to change due to weather conditions.

Stay safe on the water
We’d like to remind you to always exercise caution on the water, as river and lake levels can change at any time depending on weather and other factors.

The best way to get the most current information on anticipated elevation changes on Coeur d’Alene Lake, Lake Spokane, and the Spokane River is to call Avista’s 24-hour telephone information line.

In Idaho, call (208) 769-1357; in Washington, call (509) 495-8043.

The recorded information is provided to advise shoreline property owners, commercial and recreational users of changes in lake and river elevation levels that may affect plans for water use. You can also check current river and lake levels on our website.

 
Published: 11/2/2012  10:13 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Sep 12 , 2012
Monroe Street Dam
Visitors to the area near Monroe Street Dam will see a crane relocating rock, gravel and sediment that
has accumulated at Monroe Street Dam in downtown Spokane.
 
Periodic maintenance of the dam helps ensure safe and efficient hydropower
 
 
This week, Avista has begun removing and relocating rock, gravel and sediment that has accumulated at Monroe Street Dam in downtown Spokane, in accordance with state permits.

Scuba divers at Monroe Street Dam intake gates
After a crane operator dredges the Monroe Street
Dam forebay, we contract with a professional diver
to go down to the base of the dam to remove
accumulated material that the crane can’t get.

Click on the video above to see underwater
footage of an Associated Underwater Services
(AUS) diver removing material from the intake
gate. The footage is courtesy of AUS.
High and extended river flows earlier this spring caused large amounts of rocks, gravel and other materials to accumulate at the dam. When rocks and other materials pile up in front of the dam, they block the intake structure, which lowers our generating capacity. This periodic maintenance of the dam prevents damage to the intake structure and allows us to maintain power production.

Over the next two to three weeks, a crane located near the southern part of the dam will collect the accumulated materials from the forebay, the area immediately upstream of the dam, and then place them back into the river below the dam.

“Public safety and protecting the surrounding environment are Avista’s top priorities as we do this work,” said Speed Fitzhugh, Spokane River license manager for Avista. “Redistributing the materials back into the river will allow them to continue to serve as a potential gravel source for spawning habitat in the lower Spokane River.”

Visitors should keep clear of the crane, which will be fenced in for safety reasons. For your safety, please stay out of the river in this area and keep clear of designated work areas.

About Monroe Street Dam
Avista's first hydroelectric development, Monroe Street Dam has been producing power since 1890 – longer than any other hydroelectric development currently in operation in the state of Washington.

Avista, then Washington Water Power, constructed the dam at a natural waterfall at Spokane's Lower Falls. The dam was rebuilt in 1974, and a new underground powerhouse was built in 1992. Since Monroe Street Dam is a low head concrete gravity dam designed and built to provide aesthetically pleasing flows, it doesn’t have spill gates that allow for rocks and other natural materials to pass through. Since the reconstruction in the 1970s, Avista has periodically removed and relocated natural materials about every two years to ensure the plant is generating power safely and efficiently.
 
After a crane operator dredges the Monroe Street Dam forebay, we contract with a professional diver to go down to the base of the dam to remove accumulated material that the crane can’t get.
 
Click on the video above to see underwater footage of an Associated Underwater Services (AUS) diver removing material from the intake gate. The footage is courtesy of AUS.
 
Published: 9/12/2012  4:35 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Aug 31 , 2012
Compare before and after river flows.
These two photos of Spokane River’s north channel
in Riverfront Park illustrate the difference Avista’s
aesthetic spills project makes. The one on the top
was taken before the project began, with river flows
at 500 cubic feet per second (CFS). The one on the
bottom was taken this month, with river flows at 300
CFS.
Compare before and after images.
What a difference an aesthetic flows project makes.
If you compare the river during this time of year to
years past, you will notice the falls are flowing with
water. These photos were taken from Post Street
Bridge facing east towards Canada Island in River
-front Park. The top photo was taken before the
project began, with river flows at 500 cubic feet per
second (CFS). The photo at the bottom was taken
this month, with river flows at 300 CFS. Even though
there is less water flow, restoring the riverbed to
more of a natural state provides many aesthetic
and environmental benefits.
Avista’s aesthetic spills project benefits begin to unfold as water levels decrease

If you live in or visit Spokane in the final weeks of summer, you might take the opportunity to go look at the north and south channels of the Spokane River flows in Riverfront Park. If you compare the river during this time of year to years past, you will notice the falls are flowing with water.

Each summer, usually in July or August, river flows decrease substantially. In the past, this left the two channels dry with just a trickle of water flowing through the south channel.

In the summer of 2010, as part of the aesthetic spills requirement in our federal license to operate Upper Falls Dam, Avista and several stakeholder groups took part in a assessing test flows to determine whether permanent channel modifications could enhance the view of the river during periods of low river flow. These groups, including the City of Spokane, Friends of the Falls, Spokane Canoe and Kayak Club, the Friends of the Centennial Trail and The Sierra Club were trying to learn whether the same or better, aesthetic effects could be achieved with 300 cubic feet per second (CFS) flowing through the two channels, than 500 CFS would without modifications.

During the aesthetic spill test, biologists also assessed the impact of potential channel modifications to fish and fish habitat in the river through the park and downstream.

The test was successful, and last year, Avista and its contractors, Land Expressions LLC and CEMROCK, gave the south and north channels a makeover to help restore the Spokane River’s beauty to a more natural state, the way it once was before early developers in Spokane cut into the bedrock to collect water during dry times. The enhancements, using “weirs" that look like the natural bedrock in the river, spread water more evenly throughout the Upper Falls’ two channels that run north and south of Canada Island.  Combined, they produce an aesthetically pleasing flow of water that viewers can enjoy throughout the year.

“Avista and our contractors took a new and creative approach to restoring the falls to a more natural state,” said Spokane River License Manager Speed Fitzhugh. “We matched the color, shape and texture of the weirs to that of the bedrock to produce seamless, natural looking river flows. As far as we’ve been able to determine, it’s the first project of its kind in North America.”

You can learn more and see photos of the construction of the aesthetic spills project.

You may remember this year we had a longer than normal run-off season, with high, fast river flows in the Spokane and other area rivers. Thanks to the collaborative effort of Avista, our stakeholders and contractors, visitors to downtown Spokane no longer have to look at a dry riverbed during the warm summer days.

Protecting natural resources and operating our dams responsibly helps us continue to generate clean, reliable and cost-effective hydroelectric power for our customers. Last year’s aesthetic spills project on the Spokane River has improved the scenery in downtown Spokane and recreated habitat for fish, birds, and other local wildlife, something that we can all be proud of for generations to come.

KXLY video
If you pig out in the park this weekend, check out the falls
If you happen to visit Riverfront Park for Pig Out in the Park or for any other event or reason, you can check out the falls yourself. KXLY’s Jeff Humphrey covered the aesthetic spills project in this week’s news and interviewed Avista’s Spokane River License Manager, Speed Fitzhugh.

 

Published: 8/31/2012  4:15 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Jul 25 , 2012
Vaughn with game biologist Joe Huston
Montana Fish and Game Biologist Joe Huston and WWP biologist Tim Vaughn (right) prepare brown trout eggs for
planting in 1966, as part of ongoing efforts to improve local sport fishing.
 
At Avista we talk a lot about our legacy and commitment to environmental stewardship. Tim Vaughan, Washington Water Power (WWP) retiree who passed away earlier this month at the age of 95, was instrumental in helping to build that legacy at Avista. He also left a legacy of his own - the importance of relationships and a passion for nature and the outdoors.

Vaughan was a pioneer of natural resource protection, and has been recognized as the one of the first biologists in the country hired by a power company to address the impact of dams on habitat and fish and wildlife. After first working as a consultant to WWP during the construction of Cabinet Gorge Dam in the early 1950s, Vaughan used his relationship-building skills to successfully show WWP leadership the need to hire a biologist on a permanent basis. Thus began Vaughan’s 25-year career at Avista – first as a founding member of the Environmental Affairs department, and later as manager of the department.

Through partnerships with agencies such as Idaho Fish and Game, Vaughan worked to creatively and jointly reach resource-preservation goals. Bob Anderson, former director of Avista’s Environmental Affairs department and a long-time friend of Vaughan said, “Tim lived the example of respecting others and building collaborative relationships. That’s just how he was, and it set the stage for how we’ve carried out big efforts like hydro relicensing.”

Today, as we celebrate the 60th anniversary of generating power at Cabinet Gorge, Avista employees in the Environmental Affairs department work toward the same goals Vaughan envisioned long ago. Further, environmental stewardship is deeply embedded in our company culture.

Bruce Howard, director of Environmental Affairs, expects this type of respect for our environment to continue far into the future. “Tim’s legacy is now ours to carry on,” said Howard. And Avista employees will do just that.
Published: 7/25/2012  2:11 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

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