Dec 22 , 2011

By Dan Kolbet

New York Times
The New York Times blog Green, which focuses on energy and the environment, recently featured Avista’s innovative Bull Trout genetic testing work on the Clark Fork River. We’re doing the project as part of our FERC license to operate the Cabinet Gorge and Noxon Rapids dams on the river. The ultimate goal is to protect the genetic integrity of the fish and boost their numbers. It’s a pretty cool project and it’s nice to see this national recognition.

Here are the first couple paragraphs of the article. See the full article here.

Trucking Trout to Their Native Streams

By Deborah Weisberg, NY TImes

In an innovative conservation effort, biologists on the Clark Fork River are using genetic testing to help get bull trout back to their natal streams to spawn.

Fulfilling a requirement for the relicensing of its two hydroelectric power plants on the river in Idaho and Montana, Avista Utilities is having the fin tissue of randomly caught adult bull trout “fingerprinted.” Juvenile fish in the natal streams are also sampled to determine whether they carry the DNA of the adults.

Continue Reading at the New York Times website here.

Published: 12/22/2011  9:04 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Nov 08 , 2011
Noxon video
 
Video Interview by Brandi Smith
 
The last turbine to be upgraded at Noxon Rapids Dam was removed from service on Oct. 19, 2011. Avista's Brandi Smith interviewed project engineer P.J. Henscheid on the big day. See the video above.
 
The removal of the turbine is part of a $45 million project to upgrade four original generating units with newer, more efficient technology. The project started in July 2008 and is on schedule to be finished by spring 2012.

Learn more about the project here.

UPDATE Febrary 2012: The new Unit 4 has been installed. Watch a video of the crew discussing the project.

Published: 11/8/2011  8:45 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Nov 07 , 2011
red cart slide show
 
Avista employees rescue stranded shopping cart, remove rusted blight from Spokane River
 
Post by Dan Kolbet

When Avista’s Ben McArthur saw an unsightly blight in the middle of the Spokane River, near the Hamilton Street Bridge, he didn’t ignore it like the thousands of others who passed by it every day. He and his co-workers took action. A red grocery store shopping cart had found its way onto a small island in the middle of the river. No one is sure exactly how it got there. Low water levels made it stand out.

McArthur and friends would have none of it. McArthur contacted fellow employee Celene Olgeirsson who just happens to be the President of the Spokane Canoe and Kayak Club. As an experienced kayaker Olgeirsson had the right equipment and knowledge to do the heavy lifting in the water and ensure the safety of all involved.

McArthur and Olgeirsson, with the help of another Avista employee, Ray Burnham, spent a lunch hour near the end of October on the project. On a crisp, clear day, Olgeirsson glided out to the island and attached a rope to the cart, while those on shore pulled it in. The whole deal took only 45 minutes.

Avista employees do an annual volunteer river clean up near the Mission Campus and regularly find large discarded items on Avista’s adopted mile of the Centennial Trail – shopping carts, tires and furniture included. Rarely do items make it so far into the river.

McArthur returned the cart to store employees, who promised to properly dispose of the wreckage.

Kudos to McArthur, Olgeirsson and Burnham for bettering the Spokane River for the community.

*Editors note: River users should be sure to follow all posted safety warning and closure signs on the water and especially near hydroelectric facilities. For more information about safety in the river and near dams, click here.
 
Published: 11/7/2011  3:13 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Oct 27 , 2011
Noxon pics
 
Post by Brandi Smith
 
What weighs 120 tons and has been generating clean and reliable hydropower for 52 years? A turbine runner at Noxon Rapids Dam that has been in service since the dam’s opening in 1959.

On October 19, the project reached a milestone. The last turbine to be upgraded at Noxon Rapids Dam was removed from service. The removal of the turbine is part of a $45 million project to upgrade four original generating units with newer, more efficient technology. The project started in July 2008 and is on schedule to be finished by spring 2012.

The upgraded units are expected to increase the total generating capacity of the dam by an estimated 30 megawatts. The upgrades enhance Avista’s ability to serve our customers because it lets us generate more power using the same amount of water, rather than securing it somewhere else. The new turbines also boast features such as smooth edges and corners and a stainless steel body that weighs just 65 tons. The incremental energy they produce is already helping Avista meet its Washington State renewable portfolio standards as well.

Removing an old turbine isn’t easy business. They are cast steel beasts weighing approximately 120 tons. The prep work alone takes hundreds of hours of skilled labor and craftsmanship to get the turbine ready for retirement. Once the big day comes, a large crane is used to lift it out of the penstock. It’s a slow and careful process that takes a full day to complete, which makes Noxon Rapids’ stellar safety record of 20 years and counting for zero lost-time accidents even more impressive.

The final new replacement turbine is expected to be in service by spring 2012. As for the old turbine, we hope to move it to the dam’s public viewing area as an added attraction to an already beautiful and scenic park.
Published: 10/27/2011  3:47 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Sep 15 , 2011
If approved, electric rates would go down, gas would slightly go up
 

Last month we shared with you about the annual tariff filings we made in Idaho and Oregon.Today we made similar filings in Washington that could decrease electric rates by 2.64 percent and increase natural gas prices by an overall 0.96 percent. If our requests are approved by the Washington Utilities and Transportation (UTC), new rates would become effective Nov. 1.  Read the news release to learn more.

You may wonder why we’re asking to decrease electric prices in Washington when we have a request before the utility commission to increase rates. Simply put, the requests impact your bill in different ways.

Today’s request is asking the WUTC for approval to pass through to customers $9.2 million Avista is expected to receive through a Bonneville Power Administration program. If approved, you’ll receive those benefits in the form of a monthly credit on your electric bill. This is a pass-through that has no impact on company earnings.

The request we made in May to increase electric and natural gas rates is seeking to recover  significant investments Avista has made in generating and delivering energy to our customers. It’s called a general rate case, and the WUTC has up to 11 months to review and issue a decision on the request.

Rates are complicated and can be confusing. So, post a question below and we’ll get back to you with an answer about rates or on anything else you’d like to know about.
Published: 9/15/2011  1:24 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Sep 14 , 2011
Spokane River Weir Slideshow

Weirs are being built in the bed of the Spokane River downtown. What's a "weir" anyway?
 
Post by Brandi Smith
 
I recently had the opportunity to visit the Aesthetic Flows Project taking place in the Spokane River’s North and Middle channels in downtown Spokane. I received special permission to step into the riverbed for the sake of capturing history in the making for Avista (I also relish opportunities to wear my hard hat).

The project is attracting a lot of attention from spectators passing by as contractors dressed in bright green T-shirts aim their large hose full of concrete-like material at oddly shaped structures formed out of rebar, which are called weirs. The manmade structures are designed to divert the water during low flow periods in a manner that is aesthetically pleasing and they are being made to match the existing river bed as closely as possible-both in color and texture. In fact, once the material has been applied, Land Expressions, our contractor has about two hours to transform the mud-like substance into natural looking weirs before they set up and become too hard to manipulate. They use tools like brushes, paint rollers, and shovels to make this happen. It’s quite impressive, a work of art really.

Typically, this stretch of the river (North and Middle Channels) doesn’t have a lot of water flowing through it during the summer months because river flows drop off after spring runoff. However, about this time next year, the water is expected to be flowing more evenly across both the North and Middle channels of the river near Canada Island with the addition of the weirs.
 
The work you see Avista doing isn’t just about looks, as the name suggests. It’s part of our new 50-year Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license to operate our five hydroelectric facilities located on the Spokane River. The purpose of the Aesthetic Flows Project is to return the river’s channels to a more natural state, the way they were before early developers cut into the bedrock to divert water during dry times.

The project is expected to be completed by the end of October. Once this is done, there may not be another opportunity for me to don my hardhat in that stretch of the river for quite some time. In the slide show above, you can check out some of the recent photos of the project as it progresses.

If you have any questions about this project, please feel free to call Speed Fitzhugh, Avista’s Spokane River License Manager at, (509) 495-4998.
Published: 9/14/2011  11:03 AM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Sep 08 , 2011

 This week, we started removing accumulated rock and gravel from the forebay, (the area that pools behind the dam) at Monroe Street and are relocating the materials back into the river below the dam.

Post by Brandi Smith
 
If you happened to be in downtown Spokane over the weekend taking part in the festivities that go along with Pig Out in the Park, you may have noticed the large crane sitting near the Monroe Street dam as well as other projects taking place in and around the Spokane River. 

Removing accumulated rock and gravel from the forebay
Removing accumulated rock and gravel from
Monroe Street Dam forebay. Enlarge photo.
The work is part of Avista’s 50-year Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license to operate our five hydroelectric dams on the river and will help protect the resources and operations of our dams in order to generate clean, reliable and cost-effective hydropower for our customers.

This week, we started removing accumulated rock and gravel from the forebay, (the area that pools behind the dam) at Monroe Street and are relocating the materials back into the river below the dam. This is being done because the high river flows from this spring caused large amounts of rock, gravel and other materials to accumulate at the dam. The accumulated rock can damage the intake structure where water enters the turbine, thus interrupting clean and efficient power generation.

Before we were able to begin the project, we performed a bathymetry survey which illustrates the terrain under water so we know where the material has accumulated. We also sampled and tested the materials for contaminants to determine whether or not the rock and gravel could safely be placed back into the river below the dam. The testing and analysis of the sample materials was conducted by a third-party that determined the material was safe to relocate downstream. Once the rock removal is complete, we will perform a second bathymetry survey in order to calculate the total amount of material removed from the forebay.

Other projects that are highly visible to downtown visitors include the construction of a new viewing platform at Upper Falls and the Aesthetic Flows Project in the Upper Falls’ north and south channels.  Look for more information about these projects here on the blog as they continue to progress. In the meantime, if you would like additional information about Avista’s hydroelectric projects, please contact Speed Fitzhugh, Spokane River License Manager for Avista at, 509-495-4998.
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River video
Last year we did this video that showed the relocation of rock and gravel in action. Taken Aug. 2010.
 
 
Published: 9/8/2011  2:07 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Sep 06 , 2011
Drawdown to winter level begins on Tuesday after Labor Day
 
 
Avista is beginning its annual fall drawdown of Lake Coeur d’Alene Sept. 6. The lake will be gradually lowered approximately a foot from full pool by the end of September, and an additional 1½ feet per month thereafter until reaching its winter level. Property owners and boaters should take measures to secure docks and boats for the winter season during this period.

As part of Avista’s FERC license to operate its Spokane River Hydroelectric Project, which includes Post Falls Dam, Avista is required to maintain the level of Coeur d’Alene Lake at summer full-pool elevation of 2,128 feet from as early as practical in the spring until the Tuesday after Labor Day. (Read More).
Published: 9/6/2011  12:52 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Aug 29 , 2011
Click to enlarge
Workers place steel anchor bolts with high strength resin into the bedrock to create a solid foundation for the weirs
during our Spokane River aesthetic flows project in downtown Spokane.
 
Post by Brandi Smith
 
Avista’s work on the aesthetic flows project in the river in downtown Spokane is getting a lot of attention from curious onlookers wondering what the project is all about. The reason behind the project isn’t just about looks as the name suggests. While the overall goal is to create a cascading waterfall effect through the channels of the Spokane River that run north and south of Canada Island, the work is related to the aesthetic spills requirement of our Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license.

Click to enlarge
Click to enlarge
In 2009, Avista was issued a new 50-year license by FERC to operate our five hydroelectric dams on the Spokane River (Post Falls, Upper Falls, Monroe Street, Nine Mile and Long Lake). The purpose of the aesthetic flows project is to return the river’s channels to a more natural state, the way they were before early developers in Spokane cut into the bedrock to divert water during dry times.

The spray-painted dots you see on the riverbed (in the image above and to the right) are outlines for where the concrete weirs will be installed. Weirs are structures that divert water. Last year, Avista brought together several stakeholder groups, including the Washington Department of Ecology, The Sierra Club, and others, to take part in a pilot test for the project using sandbags as temporary weirs to divert the water. The feedback we received helped us determine the placement for the permanent weirs.

Our contractor is currently placing steel anchor bolts with high strength resin into the bedrock to create a solid foundation for the weirs. The weirs will be custom made to match the natural basalt bedrock as much as possible, including consideration for the existing terrain’s texture and color.

In addition to providing aesthetic attributes, the project will accommodate fish passage at various water flow levels that are determined by the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Ecology. During the project, fish biologists and contractors are on site, relocating fish safely downstream due to the river flow being temporarily stopped while the weirs are constructed.

Once the project is complete, water will flow more evenly throughout the two channels of the river and will produce a more pleasing flow of water through Riverfront Park. The project is expected to be complete by the end of October so you will most likely continue to see activity in the river channel throughout the fall.
Published: 8/29/2011  2:51 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

Aug 11 , 2011
Post by Brandi Smith
 
Click to enlarge map
Whether you’re in downtown Spokane spending the afternoon at Riverfront Park or just happen to walk through the area on your lunch hour, you will see a number of projects taking place in and around the river between Upper Falls and Monroe Street Dams this summer and fall. The work will enhance fish, wildlife, water quality, recreation and aesthetic resources in our community and meet requirements of Avista’s Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license to operate our dams on the Spokane River.

As flows drop to summer levels, the following projects will take place in and around the river. If you are in the area, you may see temporary work structures, cranes, trucks and contractors. All equipment will be handled and operated with an emphasis on public safety and protecting the environment. For your own safety, please stay out of the riverbed and keep clear of designated work areas.

Here’s what’s on the construction schedule:

Viewing Platform Construction – Upper Falls
Construction of a new viewing platform near Avista’s Upper Falls Dam in Riverfront Park will take place this summer and fall. Avista is building the platform to access the Upper Falls Dam for maintenance. Once the work is complete, park visitors will have a permanent spot to enjoy the views of the river. This project will also improve pedestrian access and the aesthetics at Riverfront Park.

Testing flows last year
Aesthetic Flows Project – north channel, Upper Falls
The goal of Avista’s aesthetic spills project is to spread water more evenly throughout the two channels of the Spokane River that run north and south of Canada Island and produce an aesthetically pleasing flow of water that viewers can enjoy throughout the year. To do this, we’ll modify the river’s channel in order to return it to a more natural state, the way it was before early developers in Spokane cut into the bedrock to collect water during dry times. This project Last year, Avista brought together several stakeholder groups, including the Washington Department of Ecology, The Sierra Club, and others, to take part in a pilot test for this project. Immediately before and during construction, Avista will not release flows into the channels to the north and south of Canada Island.

Monroe Street Dam rock removal
Generating clean, efficient power is a top priority at Avista. The high river flows this spring have caused large amounts of rocks, gravel and other materials to accumulate at the Monroe Street Dam. The excess debris can damage the intake structure and interfere with power production.

In September, the accumulated rocks and gravel will be removed from the forebay. Depending on the analysis of sampled material, the materials will then be placed back into the river below the dam. Usually this activity is done every two years, however, because of heavy water flows this year, Avista will be performing the work again this fall.
 
Fishery work
While fishery work may not be as visible as other activities, biologists will be doing work throughout the summer and fall in the Upper Falls and Nine Mile Reservoirs. The majority of the work this fall will involve a study to determine the population of fish in this area of the Spokane River.

In 2011, Avista will plant 6,000 catchable, sterile rainbow trout in Upper Falls Reservoir and 9,000 fish in Nine Mile Reservoir. This stocking program is intended to provide families in our community the opportunity to fish.

Stay tuned for more information about these exciting projects throughout the summer and fall. Avista has also posted signs near the project areas to educate those who pass by about what we’re doing.
Published: 8/11/2011  4:35 PM | 0  Comments | 0  Links to this post

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